Skip to main content

Hard Candy full film and review




2005
Directed By David Slade
Starring Patrick Wilson and Ellen Page


David Slade's film takes a clear stance on pedophilia, its bad don't do it, or else. Jeff (Patrick Wilson) is an attractive photographer who likes to spend his time in internet chat rooms looking for young girls. If you've seen the To Catch A Predator episodes of Dateline you know how many men like Jeff are out there. After striking up a friendship with Hayley (Ellen Page) she agrees to meet him at a coffee shop. A few minutes into the couples date (I guess that's the right word) Jeff makes it clear that he is uncomfortable in the cafe and would like to continue their meeting at his house. 

This film is a revenge tale that is both bloody as hell and brilliantly acted. A rare combination. Most films as intense as this one tend to ignore the acting in favor of focusing on effects and gags.  While it feels very cinematic (camera work, editing) it also feels like a play. I mean that in the best possible way. The film is driven by dialogue and performance. It mostly takes place in one location but in no way comes across as stagey. 

To go any further with the plot details would give too much away. While this film was a success back in 2005 when it was released, it feels like a forgotten film. It could be that Ellen Page followed up this film with Juno and well, we all remember Juno. It could also be the subject matter. Pedophilia is an icky subject. Not one that people like to revisit. While this film wrestles with a dark subject it does so in a subtle manor. The violence is brutal but the writing and performances ground the film in a way that few other horror films do. 

This is not the kind of horror film that makes a great date movie. You won't jump and hold your partner closer as the film reveals itself. In fact this might be the anti-date movie. With that being said I still highly recommend it. The film is currently streaming on Hulu and I have an embeded copy below. 



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Trainwreck

No contemporary filmmaker has chronicled the messy human experience with the eye and ear of a comedic cultural anthropologist like JUDD APATOW. Hits as varied as those he’s directed, like Knocked Up and The 40-Year-Old Virgin, and those he’s produced, like Superbad and Bridesmaids, are all unified by their honest, unflinching, comic look at how complicated it is to grow up in the modern world. Apatow has also built a history of helping break distinctive new comedy voices into the mainstream, from Seth Rogen to Lena Dunham, among many others. Now, in his fifth feature film as a director, Apatow again brings a portrait of an unforgettable character, and a portrayal by a breakout new comedy star, together in a film written by and starring AMY SCHUMER (TV’s Inside Amy Schumer) as a woman who lives her life without apologies, even when maybe she should apologize. U n d o u b t e d ly, S c h u m e r h a s b e e n s t e a d i ly achieving cultural notoriety of her own. From her bruta

THE True Bromance Film Podcast - Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Episode 208 - Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse We like to keep up with the latest and greatest in the film universe so for this episode we're dialing up Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. In a world where superhero films saturate the market, can an animated feature distinguish itself from the pack? MOVIES DISCUSSED THIS WEEK: A Fistful of Dollars, The Favourite, Skyscraper, The Meg, RBG, Ant-Man and the Wasp, Searching, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

THE True Bromance Film Podcast - Inglourious Basterds

Episode 219 - Inglourious Basterds This week we are celebrating 10 years of Brad Pitt and his band of merry men wreaking havoc in Nazi Germany in Quentin Tarantino's masterpiece, Inglourious Basterds.