Skip to main content

Para Elisa review




A job at a magnificent house owned by a famous musician seems too good to be true – and it is – in the tension-filled horror film PARA ELISA. The acclaimed new Spanish film comes to DVD and VOD on September 1, 2015 from Dark Sky Films.

What you read above is all I knew about this film before watching it so I wanted to give you the same opportunity before I spoil anything for you. PARA ELISA is a brilliantly crafted thriller that is grotesque and beautiful while thoroughly entertaining. 

With elements of Misery, Mommy Dearest, Psycho, House of the Devil, Sleep away Camp and Who Can Kill a Child, PARA ELISA manages to play with genre tropes while never fully committing to them and in turn creates something truly unique. The first act of the film is so beautifully shot and composed that its almost distracting from the story that's being set up, this is of course by design. Ana (our protagonist) exists in a world of absolute aesthetic magnificence that she can't wait to escape. Her parents won't foot the bill for a post graduation vacation so she decides to take an "easy" job as a nanny to get some quick cash.

Of course as the description above alludes to, this is not the job she was expecting or deserves. The deserves part is what got me. Ana is in no way set up as a hero by the film makers and I'm wondering if we as an audience are supposed to feel sympathy for her or take pleasure in her receiving comeuppance. She is certainly a victim but I'm curious to see how people will react to her character. American audiences react in odd ball ways when it comes to nuanced female charters. Look at how people reacted to Skylar in Breaking Bad. You would have thought she was a fragile, ego driven, megalomaniac who cooked meth and killed her business partners.

While the film isn't scary in a traditional (loud noise off screen makes the audience jump) sort of way, it's certainly unnerving and gets under your skin. But the film also made me laugh out loud several times and revel in its pure over the top spectacle. I'm not familiar with the cast but whoever played Mommy will inspire drag queens for the next 30 years. Its difficult to pull off a film like this without stooping to an ironic disposition. PARA ELISA is proud to raise its freak flag and stand alone.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

THE True Bromance Film Podcast - Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Episode 208 - Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

We like to keep up with the latest and greatest in the film universe so for this episode we're dialing up Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. In a world where superhero films saturate the market, can an animated feature distinguish itself from the pack?

MOVIES DISCUSSED THIS WEEK:

A Fistful of Dollars, The Favourite, Skyscraper, The Meg, RBG, Ant-Man and the Wasp, Searching, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse


NO ALTERNATIVE review

Depression is often marked by sadness, despair, and hopelessness. The sense that things will not get better is something most of us pass through at different points in our lives. But depression is something more than that. It’s not just a temporary feeling, it’s a debilitating emotional state that you can’t simply pull yourself out of. The angry outbursts, irritability, and frustration that come along with depression can isolate individuals suffering from this condition and push them deeper into their own thoughts. Everyone needs to be heard and sometimes those who can’t express themselves in traditional forms find their voice in art.
Edvard Munch wrestled with agoraphobia and frequently had hallucinations, one of which inspired THE SCREAM, a painting so iconic that even the most casual art enthusiast is familiar with the piece.  Sylvia Plath took a more direct approach with THE BELL JAR and laid out the details of her depression with brutal honesty. Briana Dickerson a white suburba…

Film Threat Presents launches at Comic Con with The Theta Girl

33 years after its premiere as the rogue, iconoclastic fanzine championing indie film, Film Threat is back. First as a website, FilmThreat.com, relaunched last year, and now as a distribution label, catering to the same demographic that loved the disruptive magazine so much during its print run between 1985 and 1997.

The first release, scheduled for September 18th, is the micro-budget indie horror film THE THETA GIRL.

THE THETA GIRL, a feature film produced by first-time filmmakers David Axe and Christopher Bickel, has been currently ravaging the film festival circuit and building a dedicated fanbase.

"I'm proud to screen for you the trailer for THE THETA GIRL, a film that warped my mind," said Film Threat's Chris Gore at his FUTURE INDIES YOU MUST SEE panel at San Diego Comic-Con. He went on, "This is the first film that we are releasing under our new 'Film Threat Presents' label. I think you can tell from this teaser, it's the type of film you wo…