Skip to main content

Cinelicious Pics to Re-release New 4k Digital Restoration of Lost 1960 Noir Private Property




Cinelicious Pics to Re-release New 4k Digital 


Restoration of  

Lost 1960 Noir 
 

Private Property
starring Warren Oates ( 

The Wild Bunch)
The 4k restoration will have its world premiere at the 7th Annual TCM Classic Film Festival, which runs from April 28 through May 1in Hollywood.
Cinelicious Pics has announced that it will re-release in theaters and on VOD and Blu-ray this Summer its new 4k digital restoration of director Leslie Stevens' long-missing 1960 thriller PRIVATE PROPERTY, starring iconic American character actor Warren Oates (TWO-LANE BLACKTOP, THE WILD BUNCH) in his first significant screen role. A major rediscovery for noir and crime fans, PRIVATE PROPERTY has long been considered a lost feature until UCLA Film & Television Archive recently located and preserved the only known film elements.  Director Stevens, who died in 1998, was a protégé of Orson Welles, and went on to create the classic sci-fi series "THE OUTER LIMITS" (1963 - 65), and direct the wonderfully-weird supernatural feature INCUBUS (1966) starring William Shatner.  PRIVATE PROPERTY was Stevens' first feature as director.The 4k restoration will have its world premiere at the 7th Annual TCM Classic Film Festival, which runs from April 28through May 1 in Hollywood.
Following a very brief release in the early 1960s, the film had essentially vanished -- until now.  Three years ago David Marriott, now Cinelicious Pics' Director of Acquisitions, sat in on an early screening of UCLA Archive's initial preservation of PRIVATE PROPERTY (which, once completed, would go on to premiere at the UCLA Festival of Preservation in March of 2015).
"I was completely bowled over by the film," Marriott recalls. "A sort of hothouse late-period film noir, PRIVATE PROPERTY is deeply bizarre and incredibly compelling. Considering the talent involved - director Stevens, cameraman Ted McCord, actor Warren Oates - it's very rare to rediscover a completely lost crime film like this."
"We're thrilled to be showcasing a discovery of this caliber at the TCM Classic Film Festival," said Charles Tabesh, senior vice president of programming for Turner Classic Movies (TCM) "Our mission at TCM is to bring audiences great classic films and to help them discover unknown classics, such as Private Property."
PRIVATE PROPERTY begins as two homicidal Southern California drifters (played to creepy perfection by Warren Oates and Corey Allen) wander off the beach and into the seemingly-perfect Beverly Hills home of an unhappy housewife (played by Leslie Stevens' real-life spouse, Kate Manx). Shimmering with sexual tension and lensed in stunning B&W by master cameraman Ted McCord (THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE, EAST OF EDEN), PRIVATE PROPERTY is both an eerie, neo-Hitchcockian thriller and a savage critique of the hollowness of the Playboy-era American Dream. 
Warren Oates delivers his first great screen performance here as one of the murderous vagabonds, years before he emerged as one of the finest character actors of his generation; his bizarre, voyeuristic Lennie-and-George relationship with the underrated Corey Allen (James Dean's hot rod rival in REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE) is fueled by a barely-suppressed homoeroticism.  Shot almost entirely in the Beverly Hills home where director Stevens and lead actress Manx lived at the time, PRIVATE PROPERTY has a deeply unnerving autobiographical feel to it.  (Manx tragically committed suicide several years after the film opened.)

"In considering titles for Cinelicious Pics' first round of restorations and re-releases, PRIVATE PROPERTY immediately leapt to mind as a film crying out for restoration and re-release theatrically and on Blu-ray and VOD," commented Paul Korver, Cinelicious Pics' Founder. "Working with our colleagues at UCLA Film & Television Archive and utilizing the talents of our parent company, Cinelicious, we'll be re-releasing the film using the best possible elements."
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Richard Armitage interview on SLEEPWALKER

SLEEPWALKER is the latest film from director Elliott Lester. Troubled by bouts of sleepwalking and disturbing nightmares, graduate student Sarah Foster goes to her university's sleep research center for help. When she wakes up after her first night of being monitored, the world she lives in seems to have changed in subtle, Twilight-Zone-esque ways. In fact, every time she goes to sleep now, she wakes up in a slightly different version of her world. With the help of sleep researcher Dr. Scott White, she tries to work her way back to the reality she started in. But when they finally succeed, it’s revealed that Sarah’s world is not what she thought at all.

Today my guest is one of the stars SLEEPWALKER, Richard Armitage. Tonight we talk about his work on that film as well as his work as Thorin Oakenshiled in The Hobbit Films, as John Proctor in The Crucible, and his upcoming films Ocens 8 and the Julie Delpy directed film My Zoe.

Sleepwalker is Now Available on Digital HD and On Dem…

LAFF Review AND THEN THERE WAS EVE

2017
Directed By: Savannah Bloch
Starring: Tania Nolan, Rachel Crowl, Mary Holland, Karan Soni, John Kassir, and Anne Gee Byrd



Alyssa (Nolan) wakes up to find her home pillaged and her husband missing. The burglars have taken everything, down to the photos of her husband. The police offer little help so she turns to a friend of the family Eve (Crowl) for assistance. The film is less of a "who done it" and more of a "what happened."

The prolonged second act of the film focuses on the relationship between Eve and Alyssa. The suspense of the film lingers in the background while their relationship grows. In fact, clues of what is to come are clearly laid out in a way that allows the viewer to see where the film is headed before it gets there. I'm not sure if this is by design but the effect of having the stories trajectory clearly laid out gives the audience permission to accept this blossoming relationship.

Nolan and Crowl both give stunning performances that anc…

BFF review SWEET PARENTS

SWEET PARENTS review 2017
Directed By: David Bly
Starring: David Bly and Leah Rudick
Written By: David Bly and Leah Rudick

Moving to New York City with ambitions of making it as an artist is an uphill battle. Hell, moving to New York with ambitions of breaking into fast food is an uphill battle. Exorbitant rent makes it difficult if not impossible to get a temp job while you audition, paint, write, or sculpt. And paying $28 for an artisan PB&J not only has a heavy tax on your pocketbook, over time it can carry a greater burden on your soul. Spending tons of money to only feel like you are barely keeping your head above water is a crushing way to exist.

SWEET PARENTS is the story of a young couple who have been living the artists struggle in NYC for close to 8 years. Will has dreams of making it as a Chef and Gabby wants to become a professional sculptor. Both start side relationships, as last ditch efforts to support their careers, in what becomes a choice between ambition and lo…