Skip to main content

#017 Guillermo del Toro: Pan's Labyrinth vs. Mimic w/ guest David Hart of "Pop Culture Case Study"



Download MP3
In today's episode Nate and Austin compare Guillermo del Toro's best and worst rated films, Pan's Labyrinth (2006) and Mimic (1997), respectively. Austin has a thing for Long Johns, Nate won't leave the grapes alone, and David brings up a rough point in our country's history. Check back next Sunday at 7pm PST where we will compare Michael Mann's Heat (1995) and Blackhat (2015), his best and worst rated films. David hosts his own podcast, Pop Culture Case Study, where he psychology with pop culture. Check him out on twitter @pccasestudy.

And check out this awesomely terrifying sequence from Pan's Labyrinth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSICJJq86ic


Mimic Notes
Worst Rated
PLOT: Three years ago, entomologist Dr. Susan Tyler genetically created an insect to kill cockroaches carrying a virulent disease. Now, the insects are out to destroy their only predator, mankind.
  • Ratings: IMDb 5.9 | RT 61% C / 37% A
  • Released: 1997
  • Director: Guillermo del Toro
  • Writer(s): Guillermo del Toro, Donald A. Wollheim (short story), Matthew Robbins
  • Cinematographer: Dan Laustsen
  • Notable actors: Mira Sorvino, Jeremy Northam, Giancarlo Giannini, Charles S. Dutton, Josh Brolin, F. Murray Abraham, Norman Reedus, Doug Jones
  • Budget: $30 million
  • Box office: $25.5 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • Director Guillermo del Toro disowned the film after constant clashes with Bob Weinstein, who would frequently visit the set and make unreasonable demands about what should be shot, deviating away from the script. Since then del Toro has never worked with the Weinsteins.
    • According to Guillermo del Toro, Mira Sorvino and Jeremy Northam could not stand each other on set.
    • The scene where Mira Sorvino and Jeremy Northam walk in the hall with all the sick kids lying in their beds was actually directed by Ole Bornedal, one of the producers on the film.


Pan's Labyrinth Notes
Best Rated
PLOT: In the falangist Spain of 1944, the bookish young stepdaughter of a sadistic army officer escapes into an eerie but captivating fantasy world.
  • Ratings: IMDb 8.2 | RT 95% C / 91% A
  • Released: 2006
  • Director: Guillermo del Toro
  • Writer(s): Guillermo del Toro
  • Cinematographer: Guillermo Navarro
  • Notable actors: Ivana Baquero, Sergi Lopez, Maribel Verdu, Doug Jones, Ariadna Gil
  • Budget: $19 million
  • Box office: $83 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • Guillermo del Toro repeatedly said "no" to Hollywood producers, in spite of being offered double the budget provided the film was made in English. He didn't want any compromise in the storyline to suit the "market needs".
    • Guillermo del Toro is famous for compiling books full of notes and drawings about his ideas before turning them into films, something he regards as essential to the process. He left years worth of notes for this film in the back of a cab, and when he discovered them missing, he thought it was the end of the project. However, the cab driver found them and, realizing their importance, tracked him down and returned them at great personal difficulty and expense. Del Toro was convinced that this was a blessing and it made him ever more determined to complete the film.
    • The English subtitles were translated and written by Guillermo del Toro himself. He no longer trusts translators after having encountered problems with his previous subtitled movies.
    • The captain's room is made to look like the inside of his father's watch, which Guillermo del Toro says represents his troubled mind.
    • Stephen King attended a screening of the film and sat next to Guillermo del Toro. According to Del Toro, King squirmed when the Pale Man chased Ofelia. Del Toro compared the experience of seeing King's reaction to winning an Oscar.
    • Received 22 minutes of applause at the Cannes Film Festival.
    • Guillermo del Toro gave up his entire salary, including back-end points, to see this film become realized.
    • It has been said that, for the fairy eating scene, Doug Jones had to bite condoms filled with fake blood.
    • Doug Jones had to memorize not only his own lines in Spanish (a language he does not speak) but also Ivana Baquero's (Ofelia) lines so he knew when to speak his next line. The servos in the head piece that made the facial expressions and ears move were so loud, he couldn't hear her speak her lines.
    • Doug Jones was the only American on the set, and the only one who didn't speak Spanish.

  Intro music by: Calm The Fuck Down (Broke For Free) / CC BY 3.0  


Check out this episode!
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Richard Armitage interview on SLEEPWALKER

SLEEPWALKER is the latest film from director Elliott Lester. Troubled by bouts of sleepwalking and disturbing nightmares, graduate student Sarah Foster goes to her university's sleep research center for help. When she wakes up after her first night of being monitored, the world she lives in seems to have changed in subtle, Twilight-Zone-esque ways. In fact, every time she goes to sleep now, she wakes up in a slightly different version of her world. With the help of sleep researcher Dr. Scott White, she tries to work her way back to the reality she started in. But when they finally succeed, it’s revealed that Sarah’s world is not what she thought at all.

Today my guest is one of the stars SLEEPWALKER, Richard Armitage. Tonight we talk about his work on that film as well as his work as Thorin Oakenshiled in The Hobbit Films, as John Proctor in The Crucible, and his upcoming films Ocens 8 and the Julie Delpy directed film My Zoe.

Sleepwalker is Now Available on Digital HD and On Dem…

LAFF Review AND THEN THERE WAS EVE

2017
Directed By: Savannah Bloch
Starring: Tania Nolan, Rachel Crowl, Mary Holland, Karan Soni, John Kassir, and Anne Gee Byrd



Alyssa (Nolan) wakes up to find her home pillaged and her husband missing. The burglars have taken everything, down to the photos of her husband. The police offer little help so she turns to a friend of the family Eve (Crowl) for assistance. The film is less of a "who done it" and more of a "what happened."

The prolonged second act of the film focuses on the relationship between Eve and Alyssa. The suspense of the film lingers in the background while their relationship grows. In fact, clues of what is to come are clearly laid out in a way that allows the viewer to see where the film is headed before it gets there. I'm not sure if this is by design but the effect of having the stories trajectory clearly laid out gives the audience permission to accept this blossoming relationship.

Nolan and Crowl both give stunning performances that anc…

BFF review SWEET PARENTS

SWEET PARENTS review 2017
Directed By: David Bly
Starring: David Bly and Leah Rudick
Written By: David Bly and Leah Rudick

Moving to New York City with ambitions of making it as an artist is an uphill battle. Hell, moving to New York with ambitions of breaking into fast food is an uphill battle. Exorbitant rent makes it difficult if not impossible to get a temp job while you audition, paint, write, or sculpt. And paying $28 for an artisan PB&J not only has a heavy tax on your pocketbook, over time it can carry a greater burden on your soul. Spending tons of money to only feel like you are barely keeping your head above water is a crushing way to exist.

SWEET PARENTS is the story of a young couple who have been living the artists struggle in NYC for close to 8 years. Will has dreams of making it as a Chef and Gabby wants to become a professional sculptor. Both start side relationships, as last ditch efforts to support their careers, in what becomes a choice between ambition and lo…