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#024 Howard Hawks: Rio Bravo vs. Red Line 7000




Download MP3 In today's episode Nate and Austin compare Howard Hawks' best and worst rated films, Rio Bravo (1959) and Red Line 7000 (1965), respectively. Austin is stumped by Stumpy, Nate can't stop mentioning the first 40 minutes of Red Line 7000, and they're both wondering how the hell Rio Bravo is in the Library of Congress. Check back next Sunday at 7pm PST where we will compare Duncan Jones' Moon (2009) and Warcraft: The Beginning (2016), his best and worst rated films.

Also check out some behind the scenes pictures from Rio Bravo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDWf7j1pqiQ


Red Line 7000 Notes
Worst Rated
PLOT: The story of three racing drivers and three women, who constantly have to worry for the lives of their boyfriends.
  • Ratings: IMDb 5.8 | RT 60% C / 31% A
  • Released: 1965
  • Director: Howard Hawks (His Girl Friday, Bringing Up Baby)
  • Writer(s): George Kirgo (screenplay), Howard Hawks (story), Steve McNeil (uncredited)
  • Cinematographer: Milton R. Krasner (All About Eve, The Seven Year Itch)
  • Notable actors: James Caan, Laura Devon, Gail Hire, Charlene Holt, John Robert Crawford, Marianna Hill, George Takei
  • Budget: N/A
  • Box office: $2.5 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • Pat's (Norman Alden) watch is a Rolex Daytona.
    • The magazine Mike Marsh is reading before the Atlanta 500 (which is also on Ned Arp's night stand after the race) is the January 1965 issue of Road and Track.
    • The white #28, 1964 and 1965 Ford Galaxies featured were owned and prepared by Holman and Moody. These cars were driven by Fred Lorenzen in NASCAR competition for 8 wins in 1964 and four wins in 1965.


Rio Bravo Notes
Best Rated
PLOT: A small-town sheriff in the American West enlists the help of a cripple, a drunk, and a young gunfighter in his efforts to hold in jail the brother of the local bad guy.
  • Ratings: IMDb 8.0 | RT 100% C / 91% A
  • Released: 1959
  • Director: Howard Hawks (His Girl Friday, Bringing Up Baby)
  • Writer(s): Jules Furthman, Leigh Brackett, B.H. McCampbell (short story)
  • Cinematographer: Russell Harlan (To Kill a Mockingbird, Red River)
  • Notable actors: John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson, Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond, John Russell, Pedro Gonzalez Gonzalez, Harry Carey Jr.
  • Budget: N/A
  • Box office: $12.5 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • The last movie in which John Wayne wore the hat he had worn since Stagecoach (1939).
    • The sets in Old Tucson are built to 7/8th scale, so the performers look larger than life.
    • On May 8th 1958, just one week into shooting Ricky Nelson celebrated his 18th birthday. As a gift, John Wayne and Dean Martin gave him a 300 lb. sack of steer manure, which they then threw Nelson into as a rite of passage.
    • John Wayne had deliberately moved away from westerns after The Searchers (1956), but none of his films since then had been particularly successful or well received. This film was a return to the genre for him.

  Intro music: Calm The Fuck Down - Broke For Free / CC BY 3.0  


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