Skip to main content

#034 Rob Reiner: Stand by Me vs. North



Download MP3 In today's episode Nate and Austin compare Rob Reiner's best and worst rated films, Stand by Me (1986) and North (1994), respectively. Nate is still having flashbacks to Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Austin misses tiny Elijah Wood, and they both introduce a new segment with some sweet-ass tunes. Check back next Sunday at 7pm PST where we will compare Sam Mendes' American Beauty (1999) and Spectre (2015), his best and worst rated films.
Also check out this clip where author Stephen King and director Rob Reiner talk about the making of Stand by Me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nw1DfiOJ1cs

North Notes

Worst Rated

PLOT: Sick of the neglect he receives from his mom and dad, a young boy leaves home and travels the world in search of new parents.
  • Ratings: IMDb 4.4 | RT 15% C / 27% A
  • Released: 1994
  • Director: Rob Reiner
  • Writer(s): Alan Zweibel (novel), Alan Zweibel and Andrew Scheinman (screenplay)
  • Cinematographer: Thomas Del Ruth (The Breakfast Club, The West Wing)
  • Notable actors: Elijah Wood, Jason Alexander, Julia Louis Dreyfus, Bruce Willis, Jon Lovitz, Alan Arkin, Dan Aykroyd, Graham Greene, Kathy Bates, Ben Stein, John Ritter, Scarlett Johansson, Robert Costanzo
  • Budget: $40 million
  • Box office: $7.1 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • At the time of its release, Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel considered this to be one of the worst films they'd ever reviewed. Ebert wrote, "I hated this movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this movie. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant audience-insulting moment of it. Hated the sensibility that thought anyone would like it. Hated the implied insult to the audience by its belief that anyone would be entertained by it." The pair later reviewed it on their television show, where Ebert went on to say that the movie made him "cringe... just sitting here thinking about it." Gene Siskel characterized it as "junk" and said that it made him feel "unclean." The clip of their review would go on to become a popular Internet meme associated with bad movie reviews. When Rob Reiner was roasted at the New York Friar's Club, Richard Belzer asked him to read Ebert's review, Reiner did so, then joked "if you read between the lines, [the review] isn't really that bad." Screenwriter Alan Zweibel keeps a clipping of the review in his wallet, sometimes reading it at public appearances. Ebert's review eventually became so notorious (arguably more so than the film itself) that he later released a collection of negative reviews titled "I Hated, Hated, Hated This Movie."
    • Scarlett Johansson's first movie.
    • Following Roger Ebert's 2013 passing, screenwriter Alan Zweibel wrote a piece for the New Yorker entitled "Roger And Me" in which he recounted, years after Ebert's infamous review, bumping into Ebert, introducing himself, then saying "And I just have to tell you, Roger, that that sweater you're wearing? I hate, hate, hate, hate, hate that sweater." They then both laughed and shook hands.

Stand by Me Notes

Best Rated

PLOT: After the death of a friend, a writer recounts a boyhood journey to find the body of a missing boy.
  • Ratings: IMDb 8.1 | RT 91% C / 94% A
  • Released: 1986
  • Director: Rob Reiner
  • Writer(s): Stephen King (novel), Raynold Gideon & Bruce A. Evans (screenplay)
  • Cinematographer: Thomas Del Ruth (The Breakfast Club, The West Wing)
  • Notable actors: Whil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry O'Connell, Kiefer Sutherland, Richard Drefuss, John Cusack
  • Budget: $8 million
  • Box office: $52.3 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • Kiefer Sutherland claimed in an interview that in one of the locations of the film, a Renaissance Fair was being held and the cast and crew attended and bought some cookies. Unfortunately, the cookies turned out to be pot cookies and two hours later, the crew found Jerry O'Connell crying and high on the cookies somewhere in the park.
    • The pond the boys fall into was a man made pool because the crew wanted them to be "safe and secure" and did not want to put them in a real pond because they did not know what would be in it. But Corey Feldman stated in a interview that the joke of the whole thing was that they built and filled it with water in the beginning of June and by time they got to film the scene, it was in the end of August. So had it been out in the woods for three months and they did not know what was in it anyway.
    • After director Rob Reiner screened the movie for Stephen King, Reiner noticed that King was visibly shaking and wasn't speaking. King left the room and upon his return, he told Reiner that the movie was the best adaptation of his work he had ever seen.
    • River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Wil Wheaton and Jerry O'Connell got up to much mischief in the hotel they were staying in during filming. This included throwing all the pool side furniture into the pool, Wheaton fixing video games in the lobby so they could play them for free and Phoenix (spurred on by the other boys) unknowingly covering Kiefer Sutherland's car in mud; only discovering whose car it was when Sutherland confronted a scared and nervous Phoenix about it later.
    • In an interview by Stephen King in the special features of the DVD, he reveals that the scene with the leeches actually did happen to him, when he was a child.
    • In the campfire scene in which Chris breaks down, Reiner was sure River Phoenix could do better. He asked him to think of a time in his own life when an adult had let him down and use it in the scene, which Phoenix did. Upset and crying, he had to be comforted by the director afterwards. The result of Phoenix's exercise is the scene that ended up in the final cut.
    • Corey Feldman has stated in several interviews that of all the characters he's played, the character of Teddy was actually the closest to his personality and personal life at the time.

  Intro music: Calm The Fuck Down - Broke For Free / CC BY 3.0  
 

Check out this episode!

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Richard Armitage interview on SLEEPWALKER

SLEEPWALKER is the latest film from director Elliott Lester. Troubled by bouts of sleepwalking and disturbing nightmares, graduate student Sarah Foster goes to her university's sleep research center for help. When she wakes up after her first night of being monitored, the world she lives in seems to have changed in subtle, Twilight-Zone-esque ways. In fact, every time she goes to sleep now, she wakes up in a slightly different version of her world. With the help of sleep researcher Dr. Scott White, she tries to work her way back to the reality she started in. But when they finally succeed, it’s revealed that Sarah’s world is not what she thought at all.

Today my guest is one of the stars SLEEPWALKER, Richard Armitage. Tonight we talk about his work on that film as well as his work as Thorin Oakenshiled in The Hobbit Films, as John Proctor in The Crucible, and his upcoming films Ocens 8 and the Julie Delpy directed film My Zoe.

Sleepwalker is Now Available on Digital HD and On Dem…

LAFF Review AND THEN THERE WAS EVE

2017
Directed By: Savannah Bloch
Starring: Tania Nolan, Rachel Crowl, Mary Holland, Karan Soni, John Kassir, and Anne Gee Byrd



Alyssa (Nolan) wakes up to find her home pillaged and her husband missing. The burglars have taken everything, down to the photos of her husband. The police offer little help so she turns to a friend of the family Eve (Crowl) for assistance. The film is less of a "who done it" and more of a "what happened."

The prolonged second act of the film focuses on the relationship between Eve and Alyssa. The suspense of the film lingers in the background while their relationship grows. In fact, clues of what is to come are clearly laid out in a way that allows the viewer to see where the film is headed before it gets there. I'm not sure if this is by design but the effect of having the stories trajectory clearly laid out gives the audience permission to accept this blossoming relationship.

Nolan and Crowl both give stunning performances that anc…

BFF review SWEET PARENTS

SWEET PARENTS review 2017
Directed By: David Bly
Starring: David Bly and Leah Rudick
Written By: David Bly and Leah Rudick

Moving to New York City with ambitions of making it as an artist is an uphill battle. Hell, moving to New York with ambitions of breaking into fast food is an uphill battle. Exorbitant rent makes it difficult if not impossible to get a temp job while you audition, paint, write, or sculpt. And paying $28 for an artisan PB&J not only has a heavy tax on your pocketbook, over time it can carry a greater burden on your soul. Spending tons of money to only feel like you are barely keeping your head above water is a crushing way to exist.

SWEET PARENTS is the story of a young couple who have been living the artists struggle in NYC for close to 8 years. Will has dreams of making it as a Chef and Gabby wants to become a professional sculptor. Both start side relationships, as last ditch efforts to support their careers, in what becomes a choice between ambition and lo…