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A 15-Year Search for a 3-Year-Old Boy: The Woodstock Film Festival and WacBiz present Finding Oscar



The Woodstock Film Festival (October 10-14) and WacBiz announced a special co-presentation of the documentary Finding Oscar on September 8, 2018 at 6:00 pm held at the Rosendale Theater Collective. The screening will be immediately followed by a panel featuring producer and attorney Scott Greathead, the film’s subject Óscar Ramirez Castañeda, and forensic anthropologist Fredy Peccerelli, moderated by Woodstock Film Festival Executive Director and Founder Meira Blaustein.

Finding Oscar tells the incredible story of the 15-year search for a 3-year-old boy who survived the infamous Dos Erres Massacre in Guatemala in 1982. Set against the background of Guatemala’s 36-year Armed Conflict, the film features three courageous Guatemalan women – a human rights activist, a young prosecutor and Guatemala’s Attorney General – who unraveled the mystery of what happened at Dos Erres and brought to justice the perpetrators of one of Central America’s worst crimes against humanity. The film also lays bare the U.S. government’s covert support for the violent policies of Guatemala’s government and its Acting President at the time of Dos Erres, General Efraín Ríos Montt, whom President Reagan publicly embraced in 1982. 

Finding Oscar (www.findingoscar.com) was made after co-producer Scott Greathead persuaded his childhood friend, Hollywood producer Frank Marshall, that it was a story that had to be told. The film is a Kennedy/Marshall Company production directed by Ryan Suffern. The Executive Producer is Steven Spielberg. The film was made in association with USC Shoah Foundation, which Steven Spielberg founded to record and preserve the testimonies of Holocaust survivors, and with Friends of FAFG, which supports the work of the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala.

Tickets to the event are $20 and can be purchased at http://woodstockfilmfestival.com/events/findingoscar.php

Proceeds will benefit the Woodstock Film Festival and Friends of FAFG, a U.S. 501 (c)(3) tax exempt organization that supports the work of the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala, also known as FAFG (www.fafg.org). FAFG is a Guatemalan non-governmental organization that finds and identifies forcibly disappeared and other victims of Guatemala’s 36-year Armed Conflict. FAFG is dedicated to using forensic science as an instrument to recover history, clarity and truth, and to promote justice, combat impunity and build peace.
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