Skip to main content

SONG OF SOLOMON Review



Exorcism films do not begin and end with William Friedkin's THE EXORCIST. With entries as varied as BEETLEJUICE, CONSTANTINE, and THE RITE, the exorcism sub-genre of horror films is far more diverse than many immediately recognize.  

With THE SONG OF SOLOMON director Stephen Brio has added a unique take on the possession movie. In his film, the Catholic church attempts to save the soul of Mary (Jessica Cameron) who appears to have been possessed after witnessing her father's brutal suicide.

Mary is off camera while her father takes his own life. In a scene that could play as a confessional or an accusation, the family's patriarch lists off the reasons why he is being forced to use his knife on Mary and himself. He details how they were a good, loving family and he can't understand why she is accusing him of abuse. Using demonic control as a metaphor for trauma survival is something so natural, I can't believe it's not woven into every film of this kind.

Jessica Cameron (TRUTH OR DARE, MANIA) gives a career-best performance as Mary. She seamlessly vacillates between multiple characters, personalities, or demons, depending on how you want to interpret the film. While filled with enough gore to satisfy the most blood-thirsty viewer, the real terror in THE SONG SOLOMON comes from Cameron's performance. She manages to inject a sense of humanity into every scene no matter how batshit crazy it may be.

I want to emphasize that this film is not for the faint of heart. My wife didn't make it past the opening sequence. Over-the-top violence and gore have never been a problem for me when it feels like an organic extension of the film. With that being said, the savagery of THE SONG OF SOLOMON will be too much for most viewers.

Grotesque imagery aside, Brio frequently heads down familiar paths but never stays on them for very long. He seems hell bent on putting his own stamp on the genre. Films as cruel as THE SONG OF SOLOMON rarely have anything more to say beyond their body count. But Brio uses barbarity as a way to explore some nuanced and subtle ideas. A jarring juxtaposition that demands to be revisited.

THE SONG OF SOLOMON is currently available on DVD, Blu-ray, and VOD.  

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

THE True Bromance Film Podcast - John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum

Episode 216 - John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum No one takes out the trash like Mr. Wick. Our trusty and reliable hosts enlist the assistance of Keanu Reeves' alter ego, John Wick, to help us usher in a new era of dependability. Dave and Jairo discuss John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum and revel in the glory of their hideous Game of Thrones predictions from the previous episode. Check out the latest episode on followingfilms.com. MOVIES DISCUSSED THIS WEEK: Book Smart, Brightburn, Aladdin, Shazam!, Bumblebee, If Beale Street Could Talk, John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum

Trainwreck

No contemporary filmmaker has chronicled the messy human experience with the eye and ear of a comedic cultural anthropologist like JUDD APATOW. Hits as varied as those he’s directed, like Knocked Up and The 40-Year-Old Virgin, and those he’s produced, like Superbad and Bridesmaids, are all unified by their honest, unflinching, comic look at how complicated it is to grow up in the modern world. Apatow has also built a history of helping break distinctive new comedy voices into the mainstream, from Seth Rogen to Lena Dunham, among many others. Now, in his fifth feature film as a director, Apatow again brings a portrait of an unforgettable character, and a portrayal by a breakout new comedy star, together in a film written by and starring AMY SCHUMER (TV’s Inside Amy Schumer) as a woman who lives her life without apologies, even when maybe she should apologize. U n d o u b t e d ly, S c h u m e r h a s b e e n s t e a d i ly achieving cultural notoriety of her own. From her bruta

THE True Bromance Film Podcast - Inglourious Basterds

Episode 219 - Inglourious Basterds This week we are celebrating 10 years of Brad Pitt and his band of merry men wreaking havoc in Nazi Germany in Quentin Tarantino's masterpiece, Inglourious Basterds.