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Interview w/ Kim Coates on STAGECOACH: THE TEXAS JACK STORY



Kim's film career began in 1991 with The Last Boy Scout. Two Warner Brothers' hits followed: Innocent Blood and The Client. Since that time he has starred in over forty films, including Academy Award winners Black Hawk Down directed by Ridley Scott, and Pearl Harbor directed by Michael Bay. Other films include Waterworld and Open Range with Kevin Costner, Grilled with Ray Romano, Silent Hill opposite Sean Bean, Hostage with Bruce Willis, Assault on Precinct 13, Unforgettable, Skinwalkers, and Hero Wanted.

Kim returned to Entourage for it's final season as Carl Ertz, the sleazy movie Producer. His performance garnered so much attention in previous seasons that Ertz's return was a direct request. He appeared in a recurring role on CSI Miami. Other prominent guest starring television roles include CSI, CSI NY, Cold Case, and Prison Break. He has had roles in more than 20 MOW's including the NBC miniseries Hercules, and Disney's Scream Team. These dramatic turns on television have earned him Gemini nominations for Best Actor in a Featured Supporting Role for HBO's Dead Silence and Best Performance in a Guest Role Dramatic Series for The Outer Limits.


 Revenge and redemption make uneasy bedfellows in STAGECOACH: THE TEXAS JACK STORY, a hardscrabble period Western loosely based on the real-life exploits of 19th-century American outlaw Nathaniel Reed, starring country music superstar Trace Adkins (Traded, The Virginian, The Lincoln Lawyer), Judd Nelson (The Breakfast Club, St. Elmo’s Fire, “Suddenly Susan”) and Kim Coates (“Sons of Anarchy”).  On November 4, the frontier thriller opens theatrically in ten markets including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Phoenix, Denver, Tampa-St. Petersburg and Kansas City; and, day-and-date, it will also be available via on demand and Digital HD.





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