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The Best and Worst of the Best: Sofia Coppola - Lost In Translation vs. The Bling Ring





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In today's episode Nate and Austin compare Sofia Coppola's best and worst rated films, Lost In Translation (2003) and The Bling Ring (2013), respectively. Nate can't stand the accents, Austin surprisingly doesn't go on and on about Silence (2016), and Jairo wasn't a huge fan of either films. Check out more of Jairo's podcast True Bromance at TrueBromancePodcast.libsyn.com. You can also follow them on Twitter. Check back next Sunday at 7pm PST where we will compare Barry Levinson's Rain Man (1988) and Envy (2004), his best and worst rated films.

Also check out this interview with Sofia Coppola and Bill Murray talking about Lost In Translation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OC8VUyFNaIE


The Bling Ring Notes
Worst Rated
PLOT: Inspired by actual events, a group of fame-obsessed teenagers use the internet to track celebrities' whereabouts in order to rob their homes.
  • Ratings: IMDb 5.6 | RT 60% C / 33% A
  • Released: 2013
  • Director: Sofia Coppola
  • Writer(s): Sofia Coppola, Nancy Jo Sales (Vanity Fair article)
  • Cinematographer: Christopher Blauvelt and harris Savides (American Gangster, Zodiac, Milk)
  • Notable actors: Katie Chang, Israel Broussard, Emma Watson, Claire Julien, Taissa Farmiga, Georgia Rock, Leslie Mann
  • Budget: $8 million
  • Box office: $19.1 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • Prior to shooting, Sofia Coppola got the cast to fake-burgle a house to see what mistakes they'd make.
    • Emma Watson's wallet was stolen while filming.
    • Sofia Coppola considered cutting the slow zoom-in shot of the glass house heist, but cinematographer Harris Savides convinced her to keep it in. It is now the most celebrated shot of the film.
    • The last film of cinematographer Harris Savides, who died in October 2012, six months after the end of principal photography. When he became ill partway through shooting, Christopher Blauvelt was brought on to complete the film; the two share credit.


Lost In Translation Notes
Best Rated
PLOT: A faded movie star and a neglected young woman form an unlikely bond after crossing paths in Tokyo.
  • Ratings: IMDb 7.8 | RT 95% C / 86% A
  • Released: 2003
  • Director: Sofia Coppola
  • Writer(s): Sofia Coppola
  • Cinematographer: Lance Acord (Being John Malkovich, Adaption, Where the Wild Things Are)
  • Notable actors: Scarlett Johansson, Bill Murray, Giovanni Ribisi, Anna Faris
  • Budget: $4 million
  • Box office: $119.7 million
  • Fun Facts:
    • Bill Murray's favorite film of his own.
    • Bob and Charlotte never introduce themselves to each other.
    • Sofia Coppola wasn't sure if Bill Murray was actually going to show up for the film, going by only, according to Coppola, a verbal confirmation. It was on the first day of filming, that Murray showed up.
    • Sofia Coppola wrote the lead role specifically for Bill Murray, and later said that if Murray turned it down, she wouldn't have done the movie.
    • Scarlett Johansson said that she was reluctant to be filmed in practically transparent panties until Sofia Coppola modeled the panties herself to show her how they would look.
    • Francis Ford Coppola, Sofia Coppola's father, urged her to shoot the movie in High Definition Video because "it's the future", but she chose film because "film feels more romantic".

  Intro music: Calm The Fuck Down - Broke For Free / CC BY 3.0  


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