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TOMORROW EVER AFTER review




Every once in a while I'll find myself in a debate about the auteur theory, while I'm not fully convinced, filmmakers like Ela Thier push my opinion a bit closer to believer side of things. As the writer, director, producer, lead actor, and editor of Tomorrow Ever After if not an example of auteur film making, this is unquestionably one of the most personal and singular films I've seen this year. Her voice is an original and welcome addition to independent American cinema. Thier is comfortable towing the line between comedy and drama while exploring important and often under-discussed truths about what it means to be alive in the 21st century. Her films are deeply rooted in humanity even when they are (seemingly) a throwaway comedy about time travel. 
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Shaina (Thier) is from a distant future where humanity has taken action and corrected some of the most looming issues we currently face. In her time we have cleaned up the environment, ended war, eliminated poverty, and loneliness doesn't exist. The concept of greed is something she is only familiar with through history books. Humans look after one another and compassion is a given. Unlike most dystopian views of our future, Their presents the possibility that we as a species could actually get our shit together. Considering our current socio/political climate her vision is a welcome one.

Shaina is unable to see people as anything more than honest, without malicious intent, and loving. She sees the vulnerability that exists in all of us, a trait we shield from the outside world. We wear our cynicism and greed as cloaks to protect us from one another. Shaina works with a group of people who deeply flawed but ultimately good to assist her in getting back home.

Most filmmakers choose to depict the future as a warning of things that could come to pass if we don't course-correct. Their has chosen to show the future as something we could be missing out on if we don't course-correct. She believes in the inherent good of all people. Our borders, religions, races, and status are nothing more than social constructs. These labels speak little to the truth of who we are and ultimately meaningless. It could be that I'm projecting a bit more on to this film than was intended, but I could use a little hope these days and found TOMORROW EVER AFTER to be a warm blanket on a cold night.

TOMORROW EVER AFTER opens May 5

Opening on May 5th, 2017 in NY at The Cinema Village and LA at Laemmle Music Hall; May 12th at Savor Cinema in Fort Lauderdale and Lewis Theatre in Saint Augustine, Florida with additional cities to follow.

VOD release in June 2017.


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