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American Institute of Architects (AIA) Launches its Fourth Annual Film Challenge Part of the AIA¹s Blueprint for Better Campaign



The American Institute of Architects (AIA) launches its fourth annual film challenge today as part of the AIA’s “Blueprint for Better” campaign, an initiative that highlights the collaborative work of architects and civic leaders to solve some of the biggest issues facing cities today.

AIA is launching its film challenge along with the premiere of its new film, “CaΓ±o Martin PeΓ±a: A Blueprint for Better,” which depicts the rebuilding efforts of an architect and community leader in Puerto Rico following last year’s devastating Hurricane Maria that left more than three million people without power. AIA will debut the film at its Architecture and Design Film Festival taking place at the AIA Conference on Architecture 2018 on Thursday, June 21 in New York.

Similar to AIA’s film, participants in the film challenge should produce, shoot and edit a three to five-minute documentary to tell a story about architects working with civic and community leaders to make a positive impact on their cities and towns.

“Architects are committed to solving some of the most pressing issues of our time. This challenge gives filmmakers the opportunity to showcase how civic leaders are looking to architects to solve critical problems.” said AIA EVP and Chief Executive Officer, Robert Ivy, FAIA. “AIA is thrilled to launch this installment of the film challenge. We hope it generates awareness around the talent and important work architects bring to our communities.”

Submissions for the film challenge—due by 8:59 p.m. EST on Monday, Aug. 27—will be subject to two rounds of judging. The first round of winners will be selected by a panel of jurors from the media, architecture and film industries. A second round will be open for public voting to choose the “People’s Choice Winner.” Last year’s People’s Choice competition yielded more than 268,000 votes.

Participants will have the chance to win a $5,000 grand prize that includes distribution of the film through a multitude of channels, including screenings at the Architecture and Design Film Festival on Oct. 16 in New York in addition to travel and accommodations. The “People’s Choice Winner” will receive a screening at the Chicago Ideas Festival. Other finalists will be awarded a $500 prize.

Complete details are available on AIA’s Film Challenge website. Films from previous film challenge finalists can be watched online.

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